one full week of meal ideas

unnamed (3)

unnamed (4)

Click here for printable grocery list

Advertisements

Back to School

unnamed

unnamed

We don’t know about you, but we just can’t believe that the school year is already here! After the long, relaxed days of summer it’s time to get back into the groove of things – and we all know that’s easier said than done! This week provides a bit of inspiration and guidance to that tricky little thing called school lunch! Finding foods that kids will eat (and love!) that will also provide them with nutrition and energy is quite the feat! We hope that these recipes will do just that and help you start the school year off on the right foot… starting with our creative breakfast ideas!

unnamed (1)

Less of a recipe – more of an inspiration!

Mornings are often chaotic, especially during the school year when little ones are involved. Because of the chaos, it’s easy to get caught in a breakfast rut or even be too rushed for breakfast at all. And that’s where these cute, edible little breakfast buddies come into play! You can provide the entire household with something fun and nutritious that will provide everyone enough energy to start the day off right!

unnamed (2)

Fresh Homemade Salsa

unnamed (34)

Homemade Salsa

Makes: 8-9 Pints Total Time: 1.5 hours

Ingredients 10 cups peeled, chopped and drained tomatoes 3 cups onion, chopped 1 ¾ cups green bell pepper, chopped 5 jalapenos, membranes and seeds removed (leave seeds for extra spice), chopped 7 garlic cloves, finely minced 2 ½ teaspoons cumin 2 ½ teaspoons ground black pepper 2 ½ tablespoons canning or pickling salt 1/3 cup fresh cilantro, chopped 1/3 cup sugar 1 ¼ cups apple cider vinegar 16 ounces tomato sauce 12 ounces tomato paste

Directions To peel the tomatoes, preheat the oven broiler to high. Then cut tomatoes in half and place cut side down on a large greased baking sheet. Place under the oven broiler for 3-4 minutes, watching closely, until the skins begin to puff. Remove from the oven, and let them cool for several minutes. When the skins will start to wrinkle, slip the skins off. Continue until all tomatoes have been peeled. Blanching the tomatoes to remove the skins is also an option, however broiling results in better flavor.

After the tomatoes have been peeled, place a colander in the sink and add the tomatoes. Gently break the tomatoes into pieces with your hands and pull out the white cores as you find them. Let the tomatoes drain for 30 minutes or so.

After 30 minutes, combine all salsa ingredients in a stainless steel (SS is important because from an acidity standpoint) pot. Stir together and bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

Prep your jars by sterilizing the cans in a water bath. Place steamer rack in the bottom of a large stock pot or canning pot. Place new or clean mason jars on the rack. Fill the jars with water and fill the pot with just enough water to come to the top of the jars. Heat water to a simmer and simmer for 10 minutes.

Sterilize the lids by placing in a bowl and covering with boiling water.

Ladle salsa into sterilized jars, leaving about ½ inch at the top. Wipe the rim of the jar clean with a damp paper towel. Place lids on the jars and screw on the lid rings. Do not overtighten to ensure that you get a good seal.

Place the filled and lidded jars back onto the rack in the large stockpot of hot water you used to sterilize the jars.

Cover the jars with at least 1-inch of water. Bring to a rolling boil and process for 15 minutes (times depend on your altitude! For altitudes 1000-6000ft process for 20 minutes and above 6000ft process for 25 minutes). Then turn off heat and let the jars sit in the water for 5 minutes.

Remove the jars from the water bath and let sit on the counter for several hours until completely cool. The lids should “pop: as the salsa creates a vacuum under the lid.

If a lid doesn’t seal, either replace the lid and reprocess in a water bath for another 15 minutes, or stir in the refrigerator and use within several days.

Label the salsa and store! Canned salsa should be eaten within about a year.

grilling with dad!

unnamed.png

We think it’s quite convenient that Father’s Day comes at the peak of grilling season, because for many dads out there, Father’s Day wouldn’t be the same without a big, juicy piece of meat and his family gathered around the grill outside! Now, we know this isn’t true for everyone, but what dad could turn down a day spent cooking and eating with his loved ones? This week we are all about celebrating Dad with our favorite grilling recipes, tips for making the perfect burger and a DIY gift that the man of the hour is sure to love!

unnamed(1)

This recipe is very forgiving and loves substitutions, so add or subtract whatever you (or dad!) would like! It’s a great all-purpose rub that can be used on anything from beet and pork, to salmon and veggies!

2 tablespoons kosher salt || 2 tablespoons smoked paprika || 1 tablespoon cumin || 1 tablespoon granulated garlic || 1 tablespoon chili powder || 1 tablespoon brown sugar || 2 teaspoons freshly ground pepper || 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper || 1 teaspoon ground mustard || 1 teaspoon ground coriander

Mix everything together and place in a jar that can be sealed tight!

farmers market guide

unnamed(6)

Market season is here and we can’t wait to get our hands on some fresh local produce! There is something magical about getting up and heading into the local market and browsing through all of the local fruits, vegetables, meats, as well as talking to all of the wonderful farmers. Stay tuned, as I feature some of our favorite market recipes to use up all of the market goodies you pick up, as well as some shopping and preserving tips!

In the meantime…..

unnamed(7)